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2/2 of St. Helens.

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MOUNT SHAST

MOUNT SAINT HELENS

I for some reason always call St. Helens by the name of another Cascade, Mt. Shasta, which is a good 400+ miles south. Dunno why.

Anyway here’s 1/2 panorams.

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trying to motivate myself to take more pictures

I know my strobe isn’t powerful enough and it’s too direct, this was my first try doing this kind of lighting in broad daylight though and I don’t have a billion lights or a set of alienbees

someone kick my as so I can take more photos

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oh no

I’m alive

have an Epoc 

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okama-rama:

Parent of the Year

There can be only onein the butt 

okama-rama:

Parent of the Year

There can be only one

in the butt 

(via wyrmteeth)

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homewreckingwhore:

It had to be done.
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bottombitchstrider:

I am afraid of talking to my own friends

8’)

Source: kittypistol
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I could gain so many followers right now with all the pics of shesha and epoc I have from Sakuracon. *sign*

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elllikesbees:

moniquill:

sanityscraps:

abaldwin360:

duessa:

erinebola:

littlephiish:

FUCK

OH MY GOD NO.

Time to buy a new car and SHOVE THIS ONE OFF A CLIFF

Fuck NO.

That is a Subaru WRX - I would fight all of those fucking bees for that car.

All of them.

NOPE. I’D JUST CLIFF IT. WITH AN M-920 CAIN. OR LEAVE IT TO DIE ON VIRMIRE. CHRIST, IT JUST NEEDS TO GET NUKED.

Just so everyone knows, swarming like this is a thing that honeybees do.Via wikipedia:

Swarming is the natural means of reproduction of honey bee colonies. A new honey bee colony is formed when the queen bee leaves the colony with a large group of worker bees, a process called swarming. In the prime swarm, about 60% of the worker bees leave the original hive location with the old queen. This swarm can contain thousands to tens of thousands of bees. Swarming is mainly a spring phenomenon, usually within a two- or three-week period depending on the locale, but occasional swarms can happen throughout the producing season.

If you’ve got a swarm going on in or around your property, the best thing to do is stay well back from it, call information and locate your nearest apiary (if you’re sufficiently close to one, that’s prbably where the bees are -from-). swarms usually relocate on their own to an attractive hive site, but if they’re trying to hive in an inappropriate location, a beekeeper can come and remove the swarm safely.

Honey bees in the US are currently under stress from mite infestations; exterminating a swarm in a situation where bee removal is possible is irresponsible, as healthy and genetically diverse bee populations are critical to population recovery. Seriously, we need these gals to pollinate our food crops and stuff. 

cant go with you too many bees

This just gave me an idea.

Repurpose old intercoolers as hives. 

Then we can all have TURBO HONEY

(via barkbarkbarkbarkbarkbarkbarkbark)

Source: imprezagd